Bauhaus

Bauhaus was a revolutionary school of art that shaped modern art for generations to come. Established in 1919 in Weimar, Germany, by architect Walter Gropius, it intended to unify all art forms, 'combining architecture, sculpture, and painting into a single creative expression'. The studies, taught by visual artists Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, and Josef Albers among many, focused on the basics of design with classes on geometry and colour theory, and students were encouraged to experiment with different materials and techniques. 

Although Walter Gropius stipulated that the school would be open to “any person of good repute, regardless of age or sex”, women were expected to study "women's work" such as textiles and weaving and artists like Gunta Stölzl, Anni Albers, Benita Koch-Otte or Otti Berger have only recently been recognised as fundamental pillars of the movement. 

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